Greetings and happy fall!  Arrowhead Library System (ALS) has a long-standing commitment to maintaining a collection of current publication titles of interest to librarians, library staff and library trustees.  The collection is housed at the ALS Headquarters in Mountain Iron, but all titles can be requested via the online catalog (if you have a borrower’s card from an ALS library) or via the statewide MnLINK catalog (if you have a borrower’s card from Duluth Public Library).  If you have questions about borrowing titles from the ALS Professional Collection, feel free to call ALS staff!

Here are the latest additions to the ALS collection:

Reference Sources for Small and Medium-Sized Libraries, Eighth Edition

Edited by Jack O’Gorman
ALA Editions, 2014
011.02 OGO 2014
Focusing on new reference sources published since 2008 and reference titles that have retained their relevance, this new edition brings O’Gorman’s complete and authoritative guide to the best reference sources for small and medium-sized academic and public libraries fully up to date. About 40 percent of the content is new to this edition. Containing sources selected and annotated by a team of public and academic librarians, the works included have been chosen for value and expertise in specific subject areas.  Equally useful for both library patrons and staff, this resource

  • Covers more than a dozen key subject areas, including General Reference; Philosophy, Religion, and Ethics; Psychology and Psychiatry; Social Sciences and Sociology; Business and Careers; Political Science and Law; Education; Words and Languages; Science and Technology; History; and Performing Arts
  • Encompasses database products, CD-ROMs, websites, and other electronic resources in addition to print materials
  • Includes thorough annotations for each source, with information on author/editor, publisher, cost, format, Dewey and LC classification numbers, and more
Library patrons will find this an invaluable resource for current everyday topics. Librarians will appreciate it as both a reference and collection development tool, knowing it’s backed by ALA’s long tradition of excellence in reference selection.

Top 250 LGBTQ Books for Teens
Michael Cart and Christine A. Jenkins
Huron Street Press, 2015
016.30676 CAR 2015
Identifying titles that address the sensitivity and important topics of coming out, being out, and the search for community, this catalog spotlights the best gay, lesbian, bi, transgender, and questioning books written for teens.  The authors cover fiction of all kinds, as well as graphic novels and general nonfiction aimed at readers in middle school and high school, and include recent publications as well as classics that continue to be read and enjoyed by 21st-century teens.  Information on how to find library programs, services, and additional resources for LGBTQ teens is also provided, making this a one-stop sourcebook for LGBTQ teens, their families, friends, classmates, teachers, and librarians.


Becoming an Embedded Librarian:  Making Connections in the Classroom
Michelle Reale
ALA Editions, 2016
020.92 REA 2016
Embedded librarianship is “not one size fits all,” yet many books on the subject treat it in a cold, objective manner that doesn’t adequately communicate how becoming an embedded librarian actually works in the real world. Here, Reale shares her own university classroom experiences to offer a step-by-step primer for those contemplating the practice. Demystifying what can sometimes feel intimidating to academic librarians, this down to earth resource

  • defines what embedded librarianship is, and isn’t;
  • explains why being in the classroom is so important, and how it creates communities of learning;
  • shows how to clarify the role of the librarian in a classroom by being a “facilitator of process”;
  • offers strategies for relationship building, setting goals, and honing a teaching style; and
  • discusses embedded librarianship and branding.

Readers will feel confident applying the lessons learned from Reale’s first-hand account to their own experiences both in and out of the classroom.

Becoming a Media Mentor:  A Guide for Working with Children and Families
Claudia Haines, Cen Campbell, and the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC)
ALA Editions, 2016
025.52 HAI 2016
In a time of rapidly changing technologies, the role of the youth services librarian has expanded to include the realm of digital media. Supporting children’s literacy now means serving as a media mentor. This book empowers youth services staff to confidently assist families and caregivers as they navigate the digital world, guiding them towards digital media experiences that will translate into positive and productive lifelong learning skills, regardless of format. Melding the latest research and key messages from a variety of experts with replicable examples, this book

  • defines what it means to be a media mentor, providing historical background and context;
  • outlines three types of media mentorship: media advisory, programming, and access to curated media;
  • outlines the implications of media mentorship in libraries, focusing on a shift from the notion of “screen time” to “healthy media decisions”;
  • draws on detailed case studies from a wide variety of libraries and community partnerships to showcase inspiring media mentorship in action with ages 0-14;
  • provides guidelines for working with diverse families and caregivers; and
  • explores management issues around media mentorship, ALSC competencies, suggestions of additional resources, and professional development.

Guiding children’s librarians to define, solidify, and refine their roles as media mentors, this book in turn will help facilitate digital literacy for children and families.

Makerspaces Top Trailblazing Projects
Caitlin A. Bagley
ALA TechSource, 2014
027 BAG 2014
Spaces that have been designed to allow users to create, build, and learn new projects and technologies, makerspaces employ a variety of tools such as 3-D printers, AutoCAD design software, and even open-source hardware like Arduino Kits. Developing a community around shared use of space and equipment, a tenet of the makerspace movement, fits squarely into libraries’ mission. Bagley examines nine makerspaces in public, academic, and school libraries, describing their design and technical decisions in depth and showing how each is doing something unique and different, under a wide range of budgets and project offerings. Enabling readers to quickly gather information about these trailblazing projects, Bagley’s guide

  • Defines the makerspace, and describes why it fits perfectly into the library’s role as community center
  • Answers common questions about implementing a makerspace project, detailing how libraries are addressing issues such as registration, usage policy, noise, software programs in digital workspaces, adapting spaces, funding, and promotion
  • Illustrates approaches libraries are taking to staffing makerspaces, from Anchorage Public Library’s Maker in Residence and Mesa Public Library’s THINKspot coordinator, to the library school students involved with University of Michigan and University of Illinois makerspace projects
  • Covers the demographics of makerspace users, from children and teens to hobbyists and job seekers, offering guidance for targeting, marketing, and programming

A sourcebook of ideas that readers can apply at their own institutions, this resource also demonstrates how makerspaces can be gathering places for people to learn how to create and build together as a community.

Engaging Babies in the Library:  Putting Theory into Practice
Debra J. Knoll
ALA Editions, 2016
027.625 KNO 2016
Public libraries across the nation continue to transform themselves into learning centers for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. There are many resources available to help librarians create baby-friendly play spaces and enhanced storytimes, but until now there has been gap in the literature addressing the developmental needs and changing behaviors of babies and toddlers.  Parents and caregivers can also present unique service challenges. Focusing squarely on the how of providing quality library service to babies and families, Knoll’s new book provides sensible, sensitive advice on meeting their physical, emotional, intellectual, and social needs. Geared towards helping public libraries foster healthy growth and development for their littlest patrons, this book:

  • explores multiple aspects in the developing life of a baby, discussing physical needs, emotional expressions, intellectual pursuits, and social development;
  • highlights real-life examples from public libraries that relate to how these developmental processes present themselves while babies and families interact in the library;
  • presents Baby Steps for each topical area, providing service tips and suggestions that can be easily or inexpensively put into practice;
  • offers Big Steps, conversational points that invite librarians to think creatively about further investment, support, funding, and collaborative efforts; and
  • includes carefully selected research findings and other information that can be used for planning, policymaking, and advocacy.

With Knoll’s guidance, children‘s librarians will be informed and inspired to rise to the challenge of providing quality service to babies, toddlers, and care providers.

Intellectual Freedom for Teens:  A Practical Guide for Young Adult and School Librarians
Edited by Kristin Fletcher-Spear and Kelly Tyler
ALA Editions, 2016
027.626 FLE 2016
Year after year a majority of the titles on ALA’s Banned Books list, which compiles titles threatened with censorship, are either YA books or adult books that are frequently read by teens. It’s important for YA librarians to understand the types of challenges occurring in libraries around the nation and to be ready to deal with such challenges when they occur. The Young Adult Library Services (YALSA) has tailored this book specifically for these situations, providing much-needed guidance on the highly charged topic of intellectual freedom for teens. Among the issues addressed are

  • How to prepare yourself and your staff for potential challenges by developing a thoughtful selection policy and response plan
  • Resources for help when a challenge occurs
  • The art of crafting a defense for a challenged book, and pointers for effectively disseminating your response through the press and social media
  • The latest on intellectual freedom in the digital realm, including an examination of library technology
Using examples of censorship battles in both school and public libraries to illustrate possible scenarios, this guidebook gives YA librarians the foreknowledge and support to ensure intellectual freedom for teens.


Metaliteracy in Practice
Edited by Trudi E. Jacobson and Thomas P. Mackey
Neal-Schuman, 2016
028.7071 MET 2016
In their earlier book Metaliteracy, the authors offered an original framework for engaging learners as reflective and collaborative participants in today’s complex information environments. Now, they move that comprehensive structure for information literacy firmly into real-world practice, highlighting the groundbreaking work of librarians and faculty who are already applying the metaliteracy model in distinctive teaching and learning settings.  Representing multiple disciplines from a range of educational institutions, this book explores

  • relationships among metaliteracy, digital literacy, and multimodal literacy;
  • incorporating the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education;
  • the metaliteracy model and emerging technologies;
  • flexible course design and social media;
  • students as creators of information;
  • application of metaliteracy in specialized environments, such as nursing education;
  • metaliteracy and institutional repositories;
  • LibGuides as a student information creation tool;
  • the metacognitive dimension of research-based learning;
  • metaliteracy as empowerment in undergraduate learning outcomes;
  • agency and the metaliterate learner; and
  • metaliteracy, agency, and praxis.

The case studies presented in this valuable resource demonstrate how librarians and educators can help students effectively communicate, create, and share information in today’s participatory digital environments.

Emerging Strategies for Supporting Student Learning:  A Practical Guide for Librarians and Educators
Barbara Allan
Facet Publishing, 2016
378.198 ALL 2016
The higher education landscape is rapidly evolving due to changes in the student population (millenials, increasing diversity, changing work habits), technology (the rise in the use of social media) and learning spaces (the increase in physical and virtual social learning spaces).  Allan presents the first book to bring together recent developments in both theory and practice, covering a wide range of tools and techniques which will suit students in different contexts, from large groups of 500+ to very small classes of research students. Making extensive use of case studies, examples, checklists, and tables, this practical book contains:

  • an analysis of the current higher education landscape, the changes that are occurring and the diverse nature of student populations;
  • an exploration of new theories of digital literacy including case studies demonstrating how library and information workers have applied these models in practice;
  • a demonstration of the many different ways in which academic library and information services are working in support of student employability;
  • a theoretical overview of different approaches to teaching and learning including Kolb’s learning cycle, Laurillard’s conversational framework for university teaching, Entwistle’s teaching for understanding at university, Land and Meyer’s threshold concepts and the Higher Education Academy’s work on flexible pedagogies;
  • practical guidance on designing, developing and evaluating courses and other learning and teaching events in different situations including face-to-face, flipped classroom, blended learning, and online learning; and
  • an exploration of approaches to personal and professional development including 90+ approaches to workplace learning; accredited courses; short courses, conferences and workshops; networking through professional organizations; and developing online networks.

This book will be essential reading for different groups working in colleges and universities including library and information workers, staff developers, educational technologists, educational development project workers, educational change agents and students of library and information science who are planning their careers in higher education institutions.