Greetings!  Arrowhead Library System (ALS) has a long-standing commitment to maintaining a collection of current publication titles of interest to librarians, library staff and library trustees.  The collection is housed at the ALS building in Mountain Iron, but all titles can be requested via the online catalog (if you have a borrower’s card from an ALS library) or via the statewide MnLINK catalog (if you have a borrower’s card from Duluth Public Library).  If you have questions about borrowing titles from the ALS Professional Collection, feel free to call ALS staff!

Here are the latest additions to the ALS collection:


Rightsizing the Academic Library Collection
Suzanne M. Ward
ALA Editions, 2015
025.21877 WAR 2015
Is your institution’s library bursting at the seams with books that have not been touched for decades, microfilm that nobody uses, and print journals that have been superseded by electronic access? Have you wondered how best to identify what physical material to retain and what to withdraw to maintain an inviting collection of relevant material for your users? Then it’s time to rightsize! Ward identifies the challenges and proposes solutions to shaping physical collections for today’s academic library. Filled with sage advice and ready-to-implement guidance, this book

  • Introduces the concept of rightsizing, a strategic and largely automated approach that uses continuous assessment to identify the no- and low-use materials in the collection
  • Walks you through crafting a rightsizing plan, from developing withdrawal criteria and creating discard lists to managing workflow and disposing of withdrawn materials
  • Shows how to identify stakeholders, plus strategies for winning them over
  • Offers tips for working with consortial partners on collaborative print retention projects
  • Discusses how growing electronic collections can enhance legacy print collections
  • Advises what to do with print journals after your library licenses perpetual access rights to the electronic equivalent
  • Looks ahead to the future of physical collections in academic libraries



Adult Programs in the Library, Second Edition
Brett W. Lear
ALA Editions, 2013
027.62 LEA 2013
Programming is an important means of not only drawing new people to the library but also better serving existing patrons. Lear’s invaluable guide to adult programs is back—and better than ever, with refreshed, expanded content and new ideas to reinvigorate programs and give them a 21st-century spin. This edition includes

  • Updated chapters on basics such as funding, crafting guidelines, topic selection, publicity, post-program evaluations, and more
  • A new section on technology, with ideas for online book discussions, offering programs via Skype, and turning programs into podcasts
  • Methods for tailoring programs for specific groups, such as men, baby boomers, and seniors
  • A collection of “five-star” programs from libraries around the country that can be easily adapted

Walking the reader through every aspect of adult programming, this new edition of a tried-and-true book is truly a librarian’s best friend.


Programming for Children and Teens with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Barbara Klipper
ALA Editions, 2014
027.663 KLI 2014
Those who understand the unique sensitivities of young people with autism spectrum disorder, now the second most commonly diagnosed serious developmental disability, know that ordinary library programming guides are not up to the task of effectively serving these library users. Klipper has presented at conferences and trained librarians from around the country in autism awareness, and the grant-funded Sensory Storytime programming she developed at The Ferguson Library in Stamford, Connecticut is a model for reaching children with autism spectrum disorder. Her complete programming guide, ideal for audiences ranging from preschool through school-age children, teens, and families,

  • Provides background information on the disorder to help librarians understand how to program for this special audience
  • Features step-by-step programs from librarians across the country, adaptable for both public and school library settings
  • Suggests methods for securing funding and establishing partnerships with community organizations
  • Includes a list of additional resources that will prove valuable to librarians and parents/caregivers alike
Klipper’s deep knowledge and experience on the subject makes her guidance on serving these library users and their families invaluable.



Wordplay for Kids:  A Sourcebook of Poems, Rhymes, and Read-Alouds
Tim Wadham
ALA Editions, 2015
027.625 WAD 2015
Instilling a love of reading in a child pays dividends long after early literacy skills have been mastered. The key to successful programming is to make children become participants, encouraging a “literary ear” and love of the beauty of language itself. To help children develop artful language patterns, correct grammar, and a large and rich vocabulary, Wadham offers a range of complete programs for children ages 5-12 that introduce literature in a systematic way. Organized by age, each program

  • Begins with a list of suggested age-appropriate poems, ranging from choral poetry and nursery rhymes to short, humorous selections and longer narrative poems, all designed to be shared orally
  • Includes read-alouds that encourage engagement, such as folklore, fairy tales, mythology, and fables
  • Suggests an activity directly based on each read-aloud, with handy information about target audience and size, program length, setup time, and materials and supplies needed
  • Comes with a planning calendar showing the length of time necessary to complete the program
  • Features a booklist of additional titles that can be used to create even more programs