Greetings, again!  Arrowhead Library System (ALS) has a long-standing commitment to maintaining a collection of current publication titles of interest to librarians, library staff and library trustees.  The collection is housed at the ALS building in Mountain Iron, but all titles can be requested via the online catalog (if you have a borrower’s card from an ALS library) or via the statewide MnLINK catalog (if you have a borrower’s card from Duluth Public Library).  If you have questions about borrowing titles from the ALS Professional Collection, feel free to call ALS staff!

Here are the latest additions to the ALS collection:

A Year of Programs for Millennials and More
Amy J. Alessio, Katie LaMantia, & Emily Vinci
ALA Editions, 2015
027.62 ALE 2015
Needless to say, programming for teens can be a dubious fit for library users in their 20s; and what appeals to Baby Boomers isn’t necessarily ideal for those in their 30s and 40s. Millennials deserve their own programs. This handy guide specifically targets those on the cusp of the born-digital generation and their peers, offering up a year’s worth of programming suitable for both public and academic libraries. Organized by monthly clubs or monthly themed events, a format that makes planning and execution a snap, this resource

  • Provides an overview of what those in their 20s, 30, and 40s want from libraries and how best to reach them
  • Gives tips for extending popular teen programs to older teens and those in their 20s
  • Presents start-to-finish programs sure to be a big draw, such as a “pub trivia” night, recipe scrapbooking meetup, retro craft club, old school gaming sessions, writer’s workshops, and community college networking events
  • Shows how to program on a tight budget by making the most of the library’s existing collection and resources
  • Offers tips on marketing, outreach, and followup

The fun and popular programs contained in this guide will help libraries become social and cultural cornerstones for the millennials in their communities.

Running a Small Library, 2nd Edition
Edited by John A. Moorman
Neal-Schuman, 2015
025.1 RUN 2015

Since running a small library—public, academic, school, or special—often means making do with little or no staff, this challenging task calls for its own set of skills and expertise. That’s where Moorman’s how-to manual comes in, offering guidance on every essential aspect of what it takes to run a small library. Fully revised and updated, including a new chapter on digital library services, the second edition covers such day-to-day issues as
  • Budgeting, from planning to advocacy
  • Developing and implementing policies and procedures
  • Maintaining facilities
  • Acquisition, cataloging, and collection development and management on a shoestring
  • Circulation
  • Programming, outreach, and community partnerships
  • Library technology, from computers and networks to automation systems and beyond

Also featured is an updated resource section listing furniture, automation, book, and periodical vendors; electronic discussion and support groups; professional organizations; and resources for more information. This book is a must-have for any solo librarian or library manager with a small staff.

Club Programs for Teens
Amy J. Alessio & Heather Booth
ALA Editions, 2015
027.626 ALE 2015
Want to keep the momentum going after a successful teen event? That “one off” can easily be turned into a popular monthly club that will keep young adults coming back. Alessio, co-author of the bestsellers A Year of Programs for Teens and A Year of Programs for Teens 2, and Booth, co-editor of The Whole Library Handbook: Teen Services, show you how. Designed to be used in school or public library settings, this uniquely themed program guide

  • Offers guidance on how to handle summer, winter and year-round reading programs, with activities ranging from easy to elaborate
  • Provides activities useful for libraries with monthly teen clubs as well as those who want to plan occasional fun events
  • Saves planning time and offers maximum flexibility by cross-referencing programs by themes, allowing one program to be used with different audiences
  • Includes resource lists, readlikes, tips for success, and lessons learned from programs that went awry

Whether you’re a teen program novice or simply want to make your existing programming more effective, the club programs presented here will make teens excited to return to your library week after week.