The Arrowhead Library System (ALS) has a long-standing commitment to
maintaining a collection of current publication titles of interest to
librarians, library staff, and library trustees. The collection is housed
at the ALS building in Mountain Iron, but all titles can be requested via
the online catalog (if you have a borrower’s card from an ALS library) or
via the statewide MnLink catalog (if you have borrower’s card from the
Duluth Public Library). If you have questions about borrowing ALS
materials, please feel free to contact me here at ALS.

The latest additions to the collection:

* CUSTOMER SERVICE IN LIBRARIES: BEST PRACTICES. Edited by Charles
Harmon and Michael Messina. Scarecrow Press, 2013. “Best Practices in
Library Services” series.
025.5 CUS

“In this book, nine librarians from across the country describe their
libraries´ best practices in this key area. Their contributions range from
all-encompassing customer service policies and models any library can both
adapt and be proud of to micro-approaches that emphasize offering
excellent user-focused technology planning, picture book arrangement with
patrons in mind, Web 2.0 tools to connect users with the library,
establishing good service delivery chains, and making your library
fantastic for homeschoolers.”

* E-LEARNING IN LIBRARIES: BEST PRACTICES. Edited by Charles Harmon and
Michael Messina. Scarecrow Press, 2013. “Best Practices in Library
Services” series.
025.5 ELE

“If libraries are to remain centers for lifelong learning, then that
learning must increasingly be e-learning. But, where can librarians turn
for the best ideas and inspiration on how to implement e-learning
programs? This book features nine exemplary programs set in all types of
libraries. You´ll find proven, successful ways of introducing online
credit-based information literacy instruction, innovative methods for
teaching critical thinking skills online, ways of using open source
software in interactive learning, step-by-step guidance for instructional
screencasting, ways to work with faculty on e-learning solutions through
streaming video, and how a school library used e-learning to teach about
the Holocaust.”

* USING SOCIAL MEDIA IN LIBRARIES: BEST PRACTICES. Edited by Charles
Harmon and Michael Messina. Scarecrow Press, 2013. “Best Practices in
Library Services” series.
025.5 USI

“Since there´s no point in Twittering if no one acts on your tweets
and there´s no point in having a Facebook page with a million ‘likes’ if
library use doesn´t increase, you´ll welcome the eight best practices
presented here because they will help your library both actually do social
media in a way that matters and do it well.

The successful strategies presented here range from the Vancouver
Public Library´s innovative use of Twitter to the United Nations
Library´s adoption of a social media policy to the Farmington,
Connecticut Public Library´s fantastic work using social media to
reach teens who weren´t using the library. Other libraries highlight their
ventures into media including blogs, Pinterest, and social catalogs.”

* MOBILE LIBRARY SERVICES: BEST PRACTICES. Edited by Charles Harmon and
Michael Messina. Scarecrow Press, 2013. “Best Practices in Library
Services” series.
025.5 MOB

“Just as Andrew Carnegie´s support changed the landscape of public
libraries in America, Apple´s launch of the iPhone on June 29, 2007
forever altered how people expected to interact with services.
Libraries, like every other kind of organization, must now make their
services-not just their catalogs-available on an array of mobile devices.

Mobile Library Services provides 11 proven ways to reach out to
mobile users and increase your library´s relevance to their
day-to-day lives. Librarians detail how they created mobile apps to
how they went mobile on a shoestring budget. Written by public,
academic, and special librarians, these 11 best practices offer
models for libraries of every type and size.”

* PUBLIC LIBRARIES AND RESILIENT CITIES. Edited by Michael Dudley.
ALA Editions,  2013.
021.2 PUB

“Public libraries are keystone public institutions for any thriving
community, and as such can be leaders in making cities better places to
work, play, and live. In this important book, noted urban planner and
librarian Dudley shows how public libraries can contribute to
“placemaking,” or the creation and nurturing of vital and unique
communities for their residents. Using case studies and other information
from the field, the author: Shows how public libraries can address
pressing urban and environmental sustainability issues through smart urban
design practices, making contributions to economic regeneration, and a
commitment to social equity; Provides examples of innovation in public
library design, management, collaboration and public services; Offers
librarians, library administrators, and even urban planners the practical
knowledge, tools, and vocabulary to overcome professional and disciplinary
barriers.”